Tech Rag Tear Outs #023 Podcast (Apple, Microsoft, Cisco, Foundry Systems, Skype, MIT, Flickr)
Tech Tidbits Daily for Apr. 5, 2005

Tech Tidbits Daily for Apr. 4, 2005

This is your Tech Tidbits Daily for Monday, April 4th, 2005. Today's podcast contains three items of potential interest and one listener feedback:

  • The first is from United Kingdom's Guardian published back on 17-Mar-05. There is a research project from Japan's NTT called "RedTraction" that is experimenting with making it possible to send data over a person's skin at rates up to 2Mbps.  One potential option highlighted in the article is having your MP3 player attached at your hip sending sound data to your headphones using your skin.  Pretty interesting ...
  • The second is from Ipswitch. They have  announced an update to their COAST WebMaster 7 tool that lets you monitor the status of websites and web applications beyond just a standard ping or port availability.  This new release can also be integrated into their very useful network monitoring tool WhatsUp Professional.
  • The third item is from the Creative Common's weblog where they note that Yahoo! search index is now providing customized search interfaces of Creative Commons licensed media, and they have extended this customized search to their freely available integrated Web Search API so that other developers can leverage this information.

For more information about the links mentioned in this podcast, or for more details on how to subscribe to this podcast check out www.technewsradio.com. You can also send audio or email feedback to technewsradio@gmail.com; or you can leave audio comments by calling 206-337-1533. Have a great day.

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